First Five: Drones, an age-old FDA battle, Republicans and the First Amendment Defense Act

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INSIDE THE FIRST AMENDMENT

DRONES IN THE SKY: ‘UP, UP … AND NOT GOING AWAY’

Gene Policinski, Newseum Institute
While there are reasons that can lead us to cheer or fear these new eyes-in-the-sky, the focus of late has been more “grounded” in a real concern that has nothing to do with complex issues like privacy, free press and the like: The worry that one of the multi-rotor, camera-toting things will crash, and injure or kill someone.


PODCAST

HARD TO SEE – BUT RIGHT TO PUBLISH?

Gene Policinski, Newseum Institute
In little more than a week, there was the on-camera “live” killing of two journalists, Alison Parker and Adam Ward; and on September 4, the photos of three-year old Syrian refugee Aylan Kurdi, lifeless on a Turkish beach, who drowned trying to escape sectarian violence. Should such images be published? Are there limits, in law or in journalism? A conversation about what we can see – and, perhaps, shouldn’t.


IN THE NEWS

AN AGE-OLD BATTLE: THE FDA VERSUS THE SHILL

Jeremy Greene & Aaron Kesselheim, The Atlantic
How is the FDA to distinguish between the times when a celebrity is acting as a paid spokesperson and the times when she is merely using social media to share her personal opinion, an act protected by the First Amendment?


TURKEY VICE NEWS CASE SENDS CHILLING SIGNAL ON ENCRYPTION

Javier Luque, International Press Institute
A Turkish official claims the British journalists’ local fixer, Mohammed Ismael Rasool, was using “a complex encryption system on his personal computer that a lot of [Islamic State group] militants also utilise for strategic communications.” If encryption is confirmed to be the reason of their arrest, it would mean that Turkish authorities are willing to criminalize tools that are essential in journalism.


G.O.P. ANTI-GAY BIGOTRY THREATENS FIRST AMENDMENT

The Editorial Board, The New York Times
In June, congressional Republicans revived the First Amendment Defense Act. Unlike the name suggests, the bill would in no way defend the First Amendment, but instead use taxpayers’ dollars to void federal anti-discrimination measures protecting gays and lesbians, using the idea of religious freedom as cover.

 

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