First Five: Scalia’s disastrous decision, the Flint water crisis and Michigan Radio, a Sri Lankan lesson in free speech, and Facebook’s Instant Articles

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Inside the First Amendment

GETTING TO THE ‘CORE’ OF THE APPLE – FBI IPHONE ENCRYPTION SPAT

Gene Policinski, Newseum Institute
A common view is that Apple and other tech firms fear that a single government request to override access protection will lead to multiple such “one-time” requests.


JUSTICE SCALIA’S DISASTROUS DECISION ON RELIGIOUS FREEDOM

Charles C. Haynes, Newseum Institute
Justice Scalia was no defender of religious freedom. On the contrary, Scalia authored Employment Division v. Smith, the landmark 1990 Supreme Court decision that all but erased the Free Exercise clause from the First Amendment.


Panel Discussions

INSIDE MEDIA: THE CAPITAL WEATHER GANG

Sonya Gavankar, Newseum
The Washington Post’s popular “Capital Weather Gang” talked about the science of forecasting, current climate trends and how Washingtonians react to the weather.


Commentary

FACEBOOK IS OPENING UP INSTANT ARTICLES TO NEWSROOMS EVERYWHERE. WILL A FLOOD OF DISTRIBUTED CONTENT FOLLOW?

Benjamin Mullin, Poynter
In a long-awaited move, Facebook announced that it plans to open up access to its “Instant Articles” program to publishers around the world, giving every news organization the capability to publish their content on the social network.


A SRI LANKAN LESSON IN FREE SPEECH

Kenan Malik, The New York Times
In this country still recovering from a brutal civil war, the ideal of an open society is held precious.


IN THE NEWS

HOW COVERING THE FLINT WATER CRISIS HAS CHANGED MICHIGAN RADIO

Anna Clark, Columbia Journalism Review
Michigan Radio reported on a crucial Environmental Protection Agency internal memo that laid out the concerns in July 2015, tracked each new development as the scope of the problem became clear last fall, and, in December, produced an hour-long documentary that has become one of the leading accounts of the crisis.


ARE INTELLIGENCE SECTOR REFORMS ENOUGH TO PROTECT COLOMBIA’S JOURNALISTS?

Alexandra Ellerbeck, Committee to Protect Journalists
Recent claims of reporters being spied on and government agencies buying advanced surveillance technology without ensuring clear guidelines over its use has raised questions about the country’s commitment to ending abusive practices.


USA TODAY COLUMNIST QUESTIONS INTEGRITY OF JOURNALISM IN THE DIGITAL AGE

Lisa Travis, Downtown Devil
Rem Rieder is confident that the future of journalism is not all gloom and doom. Hopefully.


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